4.19.2013

a life vest and a whole lot of love


The week started off great for me, my husband was back from the states and we had plans to spend every second we could together. As I said goodbye at the door of our flat, he headed to work and I completed my morning routine of making coffee and lounging in front of my computer to read bloglovin'. The sun was shining, the birds were chirping away in true spring fashion and I was planning my assault on the day. Coffee downed: check. Blogs all read: check. To-do list for the day: check. Off I went through my day. I tried to check off my to-do list as fast as I could so I could watch the Boston Marathon.

If you know me in real life, you know I am a runner. I enjoy running (I know, I'm a little crazy!) and I enjoy watching my favorite athletes run. Two of my running idols, if you will, are Shalane Flanagan and Kara Goucher and they were competing on Monday. I was really excited to see how they'd do and couldn't wait to watch them battle it out through the marathon.



Little did I know what the Boston Marathon would bring- not all excitement and cheers, but watching that day also brought horror and pain. The scenes of the bombings looked like scenes from Iraq- not downtown Boston on a spring day. My heart ached as I watched the footage and my heart continues to ache for the aftermath and continued terror Boston is dealing with today. There aren't enough words in the world to speak what's in my heart and show how heavy this has been weighing on my mind. I am thinking of the families that have lost loved ones, families who are learning to live with a new reality of being maimed in a terror attack, people trying to answer the question of 'why?' My heart is heavy because I have through an attack, I've seen the horror, I've lost friends, and I know the road to recovery is long. They will never be the same. They will never forget.

Words often don't do emotions justice and my thoughts were disorganized and jumbled in my mind, so I did what I do best when I need to think clearly. I ran. I ran quietly through my town, up and down the hills, over the wooden bridge that makes my steps seem so loud, up the path past the farmers fields ripe with fresh manure and out through the tall grass of the river side. My steps were deliberate and shorter than normal, but I felt I moved with a purpose, to make sense of the events of late. I padded down the path and eventually made it back to my flat, home sweet home, where I felt so safe. I quickly noted I should work on not taking that for granted in the future.

I found myself in my sewing room itching to give my emotions an outlet. I don't often allow myself to create in the heat of emotion because it can be a little scary to let yourself go, not knowing what the end will produce. I felt much more calm after my run, so I let my heart guide me through the process of making. It felt good and was a much needed release of anxious energy.

I came up with a tribute mini quilt (it's about 12.5X12.5) for Boston I named 'to boston with love' and thought I'd share it with you.

to boston with love

detail on mini quilt


There are a million things I'd like to say about the events that have taken place thus far, but I'll save them for another post. How do you deal with tragedies like these? What's your go-to home 'therapy'? I'd love for you to join me in crafting something for Boston- it can be any medium... crayon, paper, fabric, whatever floats your boat.... Check out the Flickr Group I've created here: craft4boston Feel free to join and link what you've created!

I came across this Ted talk today via a friend on Facebook that made me smile, and dare I confess, cry a little. There is no question it has been a trying week for America, and I can guarantee each and every one of you could probably use a smile right now... and likely a hug to go along with it! Obviously I can't give all of you a hug, but I hope this will feel a little like a hug!